Grammar explanation for few words

 

🏠 *Just,  yet , still , ever and already*

*Grammar explanation*
We often use just, yet, still and already with the present perfect because they are related to the present moment.

🎳 *just*
Just used with the present perfect means ‘a short time before’.

1. I’ve *just*  seen Susan coming out of the cinema.
2. Mike’s *just*  called. Can you ring him back, please?
3. Have you *just*  taken my pen?!

Just comes between the auxiliary verb *(have/has)* and the past participle.

🎳 *yet*
Yet used with the present perfect means ‘at any time up to now’. We use it to emphasise that we expect something to happen soon. Yet (in this context) is only used in negative sentences and questions.

1. Have you finished your homework *yet?*
2. I haven’t finished it *yet.* I’ll do it after dinner.
3. A. Where’s Sam?
B: He hasn’t arrived *yet.*

*Yet* comes at the end of the sentence or question.

🎳 *still*
Still used with the present perfect means that something hasn’t happened. We use it to emphasise that we expected the thing to happen earlier. Still (in this context) is only used in negative sentences.

1. I’ve been waiting for an hour and the bus *still*  hasn’t come.
2. They promised me that report yesterday but they *still*  haven’t finished it.
3. She *still*  hasn’t replied to my email. Maybe she’s on holiday.

Still comes between the subject *(the bus, they, etc.)* and auxiliary verb *(haven’t/hasn’t).*

🎳 *already*
Already used with the present perfect means ‘before now’. We use it to emphasise that something happened before something else or earlier than expected.

1. I’ve *already* spent my salary and it’s two weeks before payday.
2 . He wanted to see Sudden Risk but I’ve *already* seen it.
3. The train’s left *already!*

Already can come between the auxiliary and the main verb or at the end of the clause.

🎳 *Ever( advarb)  at any time ; all the time*

We use  *”ever”* in interrogative sentences:

a. Have you *ever*  been to the United States?
b. Have you *ever*  traveled by train?
c. Have you *ever*  failed a class?

*Used with adjectives*

1. The army is *ever*  ready.”
_(ready)_

2. “I swear my mom is *ever*  present.”
_(present)_

3. “We are visiting the *ever*  popular Rome.”
_(popular)_

*Used with verbs:*

1. “I don’t know if I can *ever*  forgive him.”
_(forgive, forget)_

2. “How will I *ever* learn this?”
_(learn, memorize, remember)_

3. “I don’t think this plan will ever succeed.”
_(succeed, work)_

4. “That worked better than I *ever* imagined.”
_(imagined, pictured, planned)_

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